justholdme-please:

You buy The Fault in Our Stars but you don’t read it. It’s a metaphor, see: you put the killing thing right in your shelf, but you don’t give it the power to do its killing.

darrensafromoved:

Favorite Moments From StarKid Musicals 

A Very Potter Musical “I was actually just waiting for the right time to ask somebody. And I think that time is about now. So, if you have something to say just… get it out.”

Prince George’s First Royal Tour

what-the-fuck-is-wrong-with-kise:

dangerhamster:

Rubeus Remus Potter. You were named after the only two people at Hogwarts who seemed to give shit about me, because come on who else would I name you after? A verbally abusive dickbag who was in love with my mum and gave me shit all my life and someone who convinced a bunch of children that they needed to be soldiers? What kind of awful aspirations would that make you end up having? Come on son I’m not an idiot…

#bless this post

christianborle:

the Rent soundtrack ranges from “punk rock” to “drowning in tears” in a matter of seconds

avolating:

youthfawn:

luckybambina:

teafolly:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

Bless you

THANK YOU

PREACH IT 

u analysed that better than an English teacher ever would, well done u

avolating:

youthfawn:

luckybambina:

teafolly:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it.

Bless you

THANK YOU

PREACH IT 

u analysed that better than an English teacher ever would, well done u

legfruit:

tips for future college kids!!

- i dont have any
- none of us know what we’re doing
- make rich friends

bootycap:

who do i contact at marvel to get my life back

psiioniic:

lifes too short to pretend to hate pop music

packlyfe:

Here’s the key difference between RTD and Moffat:

RTD’s plotlines were complex, yet fairly easy to follow and understand. When the Doctor figured it out, you were right there with him and it made you feel brilliant.

Moffat’s plotlines are full of pointless twists that are literally there so he can go ‘haha you didn’t see that coming I fooled you!’ By the fifth time that happens, it’s not cool anymore and you just feel stupid.

—Anthony Mackie, on whether Marvel could keep him being in AVENGERS 2 secret (x)

inkerdoodle:

excuse me favorite character did i give you permission to die

feuilys:

i wonder why when women write teen novels they’re categorized as chicklit yet when jgreen writes teen novels hes a nyt best selling author and praised as understanding the tru nature of teens nvm i know why